artists register

Helen Gorrill


Helen Gorrill

Helen Gorrill

Paint, Drawing, Installation

North East
United Kingdom


Galleries

  • Affordable Art Fair Hampstead, London NW3 1TH
  • APW Gallery, NYC 11101
  • Axis Arts Centre, Crewe
  • Boisdale of Canary Wharf, London
  • Centre for Life, Newcastle upon Tyne
  • Centre for Recent Drawing (London), London
  • Degree Art Gallery, London
  • DegreeArt Gallery, London
  • Empire Gallery, London
  • Fine Arte Gallery, Southend on Sea
  • Fine Arte Gallery (Paris), PARIS
  • Funoon Gallery, Dubai
  • Hoopers Department Store, Carlisle
  • International Project Space, Birmingham
  • La Galerie HORS-CHAMPS, PARIS
  • London City Island, London
  • London City Island, London
  • London West Bank Gallery, LONDON
  • Northend House, Milton Keynes
  • Qsand Art Centre, Morecame
  • Salon Contemporary, London
  • The Brickyard, Carlisle
  • The Concept Space, London
  • The Crocus Gallery, Nottingham
  • The Crocus Gallery, Nottingham
  • The Execution Room at 02 Degree Art Gallery, LONDON
  • The Gallery, LONDON
  • Unit 24 Gallery, London
  • Upfront Gallery, Cumbria
Benedict XVI Confession Chamber

Benedict XVI Confession Chamber

Statement

 

Helen Gørrill’s collages explore ideas about time, history and reality; using contemporary imagery that juxtaposes with the Old Masters she sets out to reappropriate. Helen’s new artwork focuses on vandalising old masters and reviving art historical portraits through photo bombing and incorporating elements from contemporary sub-cultures, and often incorporates media such as lipstick, eyeliner and human hair. Within this context, the striking images hover between the 17thcentury and today’s climate of uncertainty; her portaits refuse to become passive viewed subjects as they once were. Helen’s collaged and painted portraits have been commissioned from prestigious clients such as the new Bankside Hotel adj. Tate Modern in London.

The artist was awarded a Doctorate in contemporary British Painting in 2017, co-supervised by the Royal College of Art. Her PhD thesis Women Can’t Paint was subsequently acquired by the prestigious publishers I.B. Tauris/Bloomsbury. Due for publication in March 2019, the book is predicted to become “an important historical text” and “every art student’s bible”; and underpins the artist's current practice. She is known for her controversial works: in 2009 her degree show, featuring drawings inspired by religious pamphlets that featured dominant women and sexually submissive men, was censored. Guardian writer Henry Porter wrote, "The male figures have been censored but to protect whom? The spam I receive contains more indecency than [Dr] Gørrill's work. And it is much less interesting because she makes a valid point."Gørrill’s practice is prolific and diverse, stemming from international artist residencies – and she is one of the few British artists (alongside Tracey Emin) to have her work selected for New York Brooklyn Museum's digital EASCFA archive.

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

Helen Gørrill’s collages explore ideas about time, history and reality; using contemporary imagery that juxtaposes with the Old Masters she sets out to reappropriate. Helen’s new artwork focuses on vandalising old masters and reviving art historical portraits through photo bombing and incorporating elements from contemporary sub-cultures, and often incorporates media such as lipstick, eyeliner and human hair. Within this context, the striking images hover between the 17thcentury and today’s climate of uncertainty. Helen’s collaged and painted portraits have been commissioned from prestigious clients such as the new Bankside Hotel adj. Tate Modern in London. 

The artist was awarded a Doctorate in contemporary British Painting in 2017, co-supervised by the Royal College of Art. Her PhD thesis Women Can’t Paint was subsequently acquired by the prestigious publishers I.B. Tauris/Bloomsbury. Due for publication in March 2019, the book is predicted to become “an important historical text” and “every art student’s bible”; and underpins the artist's current practice. She is known for her controversial works: in 2009 her degree show, featuring drawings inspired by religious pamphlets that featured dominant women and sexually submissive men, was censored. Guardian writer Henry Porter wrote, "The male figures have been censored but to protect whom? The spam I receive contains more indecency than [Dr] Gørrill's work. And it is much less interesting because she makes a valid point."Gørrill’s practice is prolific and diverse, stemming from international artist residencies – and she is one of the few British artists (alongside Tracey Emin) to have her work selected for New York Brooklyn Museum's digital EASCFA archive.